- 01/21/2022 -

CBD for joint pain and arthritis

Our experiences within the CBD community have brought to light many of the questions consumers have, particularly around the use of CBD and their own health. Many of these questions center around dosage, sleep, and anxiety; all topics we’ve discussed previously. However, it’s also common to see people asking about CBD for its pain management properties, particularly when it comes to conditions like arthritis.

While there’s a wealth of anecdotal evidence, it’s important to investigate the science before making any claims. As such, we wanted to take a moment to check out what the research says about CBD’s usefulness when it comes to pain, inflammation, and arthritis. This way, you’ll have a better understanding of the science, what to expect, and what to look for.

The Endocannabinoid System

To start off, it’s important to understand the endocannabinoid system (ECS) and its role in pain management. Simply put, the ECS is a series of receptors and transmitters that help to keep our bodies in homeostasis, or balance. The ECS contributes to everything from our sleep cycles to managing pain, mood, appetite, memory, stress, and immune responses.

There are two main receptor sites in the ECS: CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are largely found in the brain and nervous system and are linked with decreasing pain, anxiety, and inflammation. CB2 receptors, on the other hand, are found primarily in organs associated with the immune system. These CB2 receptors are linked to pain management.

CBD, full of compounds called phytocannabinoids, impact the ECS, supporting the system in its mission to keep us balanced. Specifically, CBD is known to interact with CB1 receptors in particular, while another cannabinoid, CBC, has been known to interact with CB2 receptors.

CBD has also been shown to influence TRPV1 receptors, which are known for increasing body temperature, inflammation, and signaling pain. In one study conducted, CBD has been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPV1 signaling, which may help to reduce the experience of pain.

To summarize, there is research to suggest that CBD’s impact on the ECS may have pain management applications and anti-inflammatory properties.

For more information and a general overview investigating what we know so far about the impact CBD has our bodies, check out our post here.

The Entourage Effect

Besides working with our ECS to possibly manage pain and inflammation, Full Spectrum CBD is full of minor cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids. When these compounds are present, they are said to work together in what’s referred to as the ‘entourage effect,’ having a greater impact together than they would individually. More specifically, many of these compounds are being investigated for their unique and individual anti-inflammatory and pain management properties.

Two cannabinoids, Delta-9 THC and CBC may have specific pain management applications. When studied in isolation, Delta-9 THC has been shown to interact with CB1 receptors, and studies have suggested this interaction may help to reduce pain and inflammation. CBC, on the other hand, has been shown to interact with CB2 and TRPV1 receptors when studied in isolation.

For more information about cannabinoids, check out our post here.

Certain terpenes have also been suggested to be useful for pain management. Myrcene, for example, is a compound shown to be a painkiller, sedative, and muscle relaxant when studied in isolation. Since terpenes are a larger topic, we’ll be covering them in more detail in the future.

Additionally, flavonoids are known for being full of antioxidants, and are fairly well established for having anti-inflammatory effects when studied in the food and nutrition context or in isolation. Cannflavin, specifically type A and B, is a kind of flavone solely found within cannabis plants. When studied in isolation, these compounds are said to have a greater anti-inflammatory effect than aspirin. Another flavonoid found within CBD, quercetin, may also have anti-inflammatory properties, according to research conducted in the food and nutrition context. For more information about the flavonoids found within CBD, check out our post here.

Additional Science

While we’ve seen some studies conducted into the effects of CBD on arthritis, they’re still very preliminary. Many of these studies specifically center on Rheumatoid arthritis. One study conducted with rats seems to suggest that CBD may have anti-arthritis applications, especially when used topically. Additionally, another study reiterated these potential anti-arthritis properties, including discussion about CBD’s impact on TRPA1 receptors, which have been linked to inflammation.

Within Canada, a CBD drug called Sativex has been approved for use as a potential pain reliever for the discomfort associated with advanced cancer and multiple sclerosis.

That said, there are a lot of gaps that exist within our current knowledge, and much more research needs to be done before reaching a consensus. One such study aims to investigate further, and hopefully we’ll continue to see more studies like these in the future.

Other Considerations

When considering using CBD, it’s important to be aware that it has been known to interact with certain medications. Specifically, be on the lookout if your medication has grapefruit warnings. Always check in with your doctor first.

Secondly, dosage is a vital factor to the effectiveness of CBD. The general consensus is to start low and go slow, giving your body time to adjust as you gradually increase the dosage until you find something that works for you. Depending on independent factors like weight, sex, body chemistry, etc., some studies have suggested higher doses of CBD in the 100s of mgs are needed. The science we’ve seen so far suggests that large dosages of CBD are relatively safe, though some side effects have been noted, such as drowsiness, mood changes, and digestive issues. For more information on dosages, check out our post here.

Buying a good quality product from a trustworthy brand will make a big difference. It’s also important to pay attention to what kind of CBD you’re taking, whether it’s Full Spectrum or something different. To better know what to look for when shopping for a CBD product, check out our post here. For a better understanding of the difference between Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum, and Isolate, check here.

There are also more than a hundred kinds of arthritis, each acting and responding to treatments differently. Ultimately, there’s no one-size-fits all solution.

TL;DR

While the science is still limited and we can’t say anything for certain, what we’ve seen so far suggests that CBD may have anti-inflammatory and pain management properties. When considering how CBD interacts with the ECS and the full entourage of Full Spectrum, there’s some research to suggest that it may help to reduce symptoms of arthritis. That said, it’s always important to check in with your doctor, especially if taking any medications.





- 01/21/2022 -

CBD for joint pain and arthritis

Our experiences within the CBD community have brought to light many of the questions consumers have, particularly around the use of CBD and their own health. Many of these questions center around dosage, sleep, and anxiety; all topics we’ve discussed previously. However, it’s also common to see people asking about CBD for its pain management properties, particularly when it comes to conditions like arthritis.

While there’s a wealth of anecdotal evidence, it’s important to investigate the science before making any claims. As such, we wanted to take a moment to check out what the research says about CBD’s usefulness when it comes to pain, inflammation, and arthritis. This way, you’ll have a better understanding of the science, what to expect, and what to look for.

The Endocannabinoid System

To start off, it’s important to understand the endocannabinoid system (ECS) and its role in pain management. Simply put, the ECS is a series of receptors and transmitters that help to keep our bodies in homeostasis, or balance. The ECS contributes to everything from our sleep cycles to managing pain, mood, appetite, memory, stress, and immune responses.

There are two main receptor sites in the ECS: CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are largely found in the brain and nervous system and are linked with decreasing pain, anxiety, and inflammation. CB2 receptors, on the other hand, are found primarily in organs associated with the immune system. These CB2 receptors are linked to pain management.

CBD, full of compounds called phytocannabinoids, impact the ECS, supporting the system in its mission to keep us balanced. Specifically, CBD is known to interact with CB1 receptors in particular, while another cannabinoid, CBC, has been known to interact with CB2 receptors.

CBD has also been shown to influence TRPV1 receptors, which are known for increasing body temperature, inflammation, and signaling pain. In one study conducted, CBD has been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPV1 signaling, which may help to reduce the experience of pain.

To summarize, there is research to suggest that CBD’s impact on the ECS may have pain management applications and anti-inflammatory properties.

For more information and a general overview investigating what we know so far about the impact CBD has our bodies, check out our post here.

The Entourage Effect

Besides working with our ECS to possibly manage pain and inflammation, Full Spectrum CBD is full of minor cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids. When these compounds are present, they are said to work together in what’s referred to as the ‘entourage effect,’ having a greater impact together than they would individually. More specifically, many of these compounds are being investigated for their unique and individual anti-inflammatory and pain management properties.

Two cannabinoids, Delta-9 THC and CBC may have specific pain management applications. When studied in isolation, Delta-9 THC has been shown to interact with CB1 receptors, and studies have suggested this interaction may help to reduce pain and inflammation. CBC, on the other hand, has been shown to interact with CB2 and TRPV1 receptors when studied in isolation.

For more information about cannabinoids, check out our post here.

Certain terpenes have also been suggested to be useful for pain management. Myrcene, for example, is a compound shown to be a painkiller, sedative, and muscle relaxant when studied in isolation. Since terpenes are a larger topic, we’ll be covering them in more detail in the future.

Additionally, flavonoids are known for being full of antioxidants, and are fairly well established for having anti-inflammatory effects when studied in the food and nutrition context or in isolation. Cannflavin, specifically type A and B, is a kind of flavone solely found within cannabis plants. When studied in isolation, these compounds are said to have a greater anti-inflammatory effect than aspirin. Another flavonoid found within CBD, quercetin, may also have anti-inflammatory properties, according to research conducted in the food and nutrition context. For more information about the flavonoids found within CBD, check out our post here.

Additional Science

While we’ve seen some studies conducted into the effects of CBD on arthritis, they’re still very preliminary. Many of these studies specifically center on Rheumatoid arthritis. One study conducted with rats seems to suggest that CBD may have anti-arthritis applications, especially when used topically. Additionally, another study reiterated these potential anti-arthritis properties, including discussion about CBD’s impact on TRPA1 receptors, which have been linked to inflammation.

Within Canada, a CBD drug called Sativex has been approved for use as a potential pain reliever for the discomfort associated with advanced cancer and multiple sclerosis.

That said, there are a lot of gaps that exist within our current knowledge, and much more research needs to be done before reaching a consensus. One such study aims to investigate further, and hopefully we’ll continue to see more studies like these in the future.

Other Considerations

When considering using CBD, it’s important to be aware that it has been known to interact with certain medications. Specifically, be on the lookout if your medication has grapefruit warnings. Always check in with your doctor first.

Secondly, dosage is a vital factor to the effectiveness of CBD. The general consensus is to start low and go slow, giving your body time to adjust as you gradually increase the dosage until you find something that works for you. Depending on independent factors like weight, sex, body chemistry, etc., some studies have suggested higher doses of CBD in the 100s of mgs are needed. The science we’ve seen so far suggests that large dosages of CBD are relatively safe, though some side effects have been noted, such as drowsiness, mood changes, and digestive issues. For more information on dosages, check out our post here.

Buying a good quality product from a trustworthy brand will make a big difference. It’s also important to pay attention to what kind of CBD you’re taking, whether it’s Full Spectrum or something different. To better know what to look for when shopping for a CBD product, check out our post here. For a better understanding of the difference between Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum, and Isolate, check here.

There are also more than a hundred kinds of arthritis, each acting and responding to treatments differently. Ultimately, there’s no one-size-fits all solution.

TL;DR

While the science is still limited and we can’t say anything for certain, what we’ve seen so far suggests that CBD may have anti-inflammatory and pain management properties. When considering how CBD interacts with the ECS and the full entourage of Full Spectrum, there’s some research to suggest that it may help to reduce symptoms of arthritis. That said, it’s always important to check in with your doctor, especially if taking any medications.